Evaluation of Pulse Rate, Oxygen Saturation, and Respiratory Effort after Different Types of Feeding Methods in Preterm Newborns

In the initial days of hospitalization, preterm newborns receive combinations of breastfeeding, spoon/paladai feeding, and/or gavage feeding. Each of these methods may have a different impact on vital parameters. 

A recent study investigated the changes in vital parameters concerning different feeding methods and postmenstrual age (PMA) in preterm newborns. The study included physiologically stable preterm newborns with PMA <37 weeks on full enteral feeds; who were monitored for Respiratory rate (RR), pulse rate (PR), oxygen saturation (SPO2), nasal flaring, and lower chest indrawing before and up to 3 h after the breastfeeding/spoon (paladai) feeding/gavage feeding or their combinations. These vital parameters were evaluated concerning the feeding methods and PMA groups using ANOVA. 

The observations were as follows-

  • 383 records from 110 newborns were analyzed. 
  • None of the infants developed chest indrawing or nasal flaring after any feeding method. 
  • During the 3 h period of monitoring, vital parameters altered significantly except in the gavage feeding group. 
  • The mean PR did not change, but the mean RR and SPO2 changed greatly at different PMA. 

Thus, Vital parameters showed a change after different types of feeding methods and at different PMA.

the effect of different feeding methods and PMA on vital parameters must be described in the multicentric prospective study in the future.

Patel DV, Shah D, Kantharia KA, et al. Evaluation of Pulse Rate, Oxygen Saturation, and Respiratory Effort after Different Types of Feeding Methods in Preterm Newborns. International Journal of Pediatrics.. 2022;2022. https://doi.org/10.1155/2022/9962358

Get our Newsletter

Filter out the noise and nurture your inbox with health and wellness advice that's inclusive and rooted in medical expertise.

Your privacy is important to us

MEDICAL AFFAIRS

CONTENT INTEGRITY

NEWSLETTERS

© 2022 Medtalks